Hesley...the Bestley?

It's hard to say...
Mon Jul 1

paulscheer:

I’m not saying you are a douchebag if you read Cigar Aficionado magazine but you’ll have to go a long way to prove to me your aren’t.

View more on WhoSay »

Wed May 1
This moved me. 

ecantwell:

(me, in Anish Kapoor’s Untitled, at the High Museum of Art last week)
Usually we don’t have the ability to see when we’re turning a corner. Something happens and it doesn’t feel momentous but later we can look back and see it as the point at which things started to turn—at which a chapter ended, or a leaf blew over and never reversed. Usually we walk right through these gates, not realizing they are gates at all, not realizing we lucked into the right code or made the mistake of turning down the wrong driveway. Usually this is a good thing. If you don’t know you are going through something important you can’t second-guess it. You can’t regret it before it happens. You can’t overwhelm it with yourself, with your own head in the mirror in the way of it all.Lately I have been unable to drive down any road without seeing every crack in the sidewalk lining it, every smallest shrub that marks the beginning of a division between we could live here and we could never live here. I have been carrying groceries and felt the rough parts of every single orange in every single plastic bag. One night almost six months ago, I couldn’t sleep. I stayed awake until dawn. I didn’t know that I knew what was happening but I knew what was happening. There is a moment when you are driving into Los Angeles from the east when you can see the buildings all lit-up and silhouetted from a long way off between the hills. Los Angeles is cruel like that. It is the kind of place that takes its clothes off for you in another room at the end of the building, all aglow in some stupid soft light, and says this is what I have for you, and this is where you are going to be, and then disappears as you try to navigate the twisted hallways and elevator shafts and crowded foyers between the two of you.It is not always a blessing to be aware of the fact that you are standing on the very end of a long diving board in a small red bathing suit and that you will never be back on this diving board, never, that the expanse of water below you is something new entirely and something that will eventually become home, but right now you have no idea what it will feel like when it hits your skin, will it be warm or cold, will it be full of fish, will there be salt in your eyes, will it have a current that can carry you over. Will it reflect you whole or in fragments. Will it piece you together again.

This moved me. 

ecantwell:

(me, in Anish Kapoor’s Untitled, at the High Museum of Art last week)


Usually we don’t have the ability to see when we’re turning a corner. Something happens and it doesn’t feel momentous but later we can look back and see it as the point at which things started to turn—at which a chapter ended, or a leaf blew over and never reversed. Usually we walk right through these gates, not realizing they are gates at all, not realizing we lucked into the right code or made the mistake of turning down the wrong driveway.

Usually this is a good thing. If you don’t know you are going through something important you can’t second-guess it. You can’t regret it before it happens. You can’t overwhelm it with yourself, with your own head in the mirror in the way of it all.

Lately I have been unable to drive down any road without seeing every crack in the sidewalk lining it, every smallest shrub that marks the beginning of a division between we could live here and we could never live here. I have been carrying groceries and felt the rough parts of every single orange in every single plastic bag. One night almost six months ago, I couldn’t sleep. I stayed awake until dawn. I didn’t know that I knew what was happening but I knew what was happening. 

There is a moment when you are driving into Los Angeles from the east when you can see the buildings all lit-up and silhouetted from a long way off between the hills. Los Angeles is cruel like that. It is the kind of place that takes its clothes off for you in another room at the end of the building, all aglow in some stupid soft light, and says this is what I have for you, and this is where you are going to be, and then disappears as you try to navigate the twisted hallways and elevator shafts and crowded foyers between the two of you.

It is not always a blessing to be aware of the fact that you are standing on the very end of a long diving board in a small red bathing suit and that you will never be back on this diving board, never, that the expanse of water below you is something new entirely and something that will eventually become home, but right now you have no idea what it will feel like when it hits your skin, will it be warm or cold, will it be full of fish, will there be salt in your eyes, will it have a current that can carry you over. Will it reflect you whole or in fragments. Will it piece you together again.

Wed Feb 27
Carol Bacca - watch more funny videos

Sometimes you gotta battle a wookie to protect your office space. :)

funnyordie:

Carol Bacca

Carol’s antics push Rhonda past her limit, causing her to cross a very hairy line.

Wed Dec 5
Guys' Night - watch more funny videos

I wrote this sketch with my writing partner, Daniel Acker, and I’m thrilled to see it on the front page of FoD today!

Starring: Me, Josh Duvendeck, Scott Gairdner, Greg Perry, Daniel Kent, George Basil, Clint Gage, Noel Wells, and Jessica Jacobs. 

Directed by Matt Wyatt, shot by James Codeglia, edited by Whitfield Scheidegger, Grip and Electric by Shane Spiegel, VFX by Ghostlight, HMU by Kathleen Pardo, Wardrobe by Rheanna Vallee, produced by me, Daniel Acker, and Andrew Congdon. Special thanks to Allis Markham from Prey Taxidermy!

funnyordie:

Guys’ Night

Don’t lose your life to Guys’ Night.

Mon Nov 12

joshruben:

huffpostcomedy:

Gay Men Will Marry Your Girlfriends

CollegeHumor supports gay marriage. Here’s why you should too.

This is very, very well done.

indeed

Super proud to have worked on this!! :)

Wed Oct 31
LOVE TTA!! Watch Nick on Happy Endings immediately!*
*When it’s up on Hulu, since it’s already aired on real TV
teamtigerawesome:

Hey! Mundy is on Happy Endings tonight at 9pm/8pm Central on ABC. Watch it and stuff, but before you do that, check out the New York Red Cross website. Maybe you could donate or volunteer your time to help those suffering from Hurricane Sally. 
Also, the wonderful Hesley Harps is on New Girl at the same time. So donate, then watch Happy Endings with Mundy, while DVR’ing New Girl. Then let us know who you think did better. We’re putting our money on Hesley.

LOVE TTA!! Watch Nick on Happy Endings immediately!*

*When it’s up on Hulu, since it’s already aired on real TV

teamtigerawesome:

Hey! Mundy is on Happy Endings tonight at 9pm/8pm Central on ABC. Watch it and stuff, but before you do that, check out the New York Red Cross website. Maybe you could donate or volunteer your time to help those suffering from Hurricane Sally. 

Also, the wonderful Hesley Harps is on New Girl at the same time. So donate, then watch Happy Endings with Mundy, while DVR’ing New Girl. Then let us know who you think did better. We’re putting our money on Hesley.

Thu Oct 25
Gungan Style (Gangnam Style Parody) from Funny Or Die

I like the cut of Ben Joseph’s jib.

benjoseph:

splitsider:

One of my favorite Funny or Die videos ever. Stick with it.

This short has been passed around by pretty much everybody I know. It’s funny and well made, and clearly hits close to home for people who create web videos. I’ve even heard some Internet folks say it makes them “sad,” and, while I understand that reaction, I don’t think it should. 

The first video I ever wrote for CollegeHumor back in 2008 was a sketch about Superman and Batman hanging out. I can’t speak for co-writer Kevin, but I didn’t write it in an attempt to be topical or to attract views; I wrote it because I was 23 and deconstructionist Batman jokes were the funniest thing in the world to me. 

About eight months ago, I left CollegeHumor - at least temporarily - to go write cartoons in Los Angeles. I left my friends, my creative partners, and my favorite city and, strangely enough, it started off as an easy decision. I felt free, I felt liberated, then, about two months later, I freaked out. What was I doing? Why I had I bolted across the country? Why was I suddenly wearing so many V-necks? 

I finally realized I had experienced creative burnout. After four years of earnestly and sincerely producing jokes about Ninja Turtles and Harry Potter, I had begun feeling trapped by the demand to make “successful Internet videos.” I had bemoaned the fact that I wasn’t growing as a writer, that the most successful videos I was writing were fake trailers that were kind of like the fake trailers I had helped write two years earlier. 

I also realized what a load of angsty horseshit that was.

The limitations I felt were completely self-imposed. Now that I’m on the “outside,” every day I see something that reminds me the Internet is an amazingly flexible medium of infinite possibility. I’ll take 1,000 sub-par Gotye parodies if it means I get to keep Tiny Fuppets, After Hours, and Sex House. (Or Rejected Pitches. Or Jake and Amir. Or BriTANick. Or SO MUCH MORE!) More personally, CollegeHumor allowed me to write some amazingly sincere shorts and, with some of my closest friends, create a series that remains the purest expression of our weird, nerdy sensibility. And we did it without free of network notes, agents, or TV development deals. 

Is this an over-written, somewhat pretentious response to an Internet comedy video? Absolutely. But, honestly, that’s kind of the point. All creative endeavors are, at some level, probably a little crass. Anybody who feels trapped by what they “have” to make for the Internet is going to feel just as trapped by what they “have” to make for television, “have” to write into a screenplay, or even “have” to work into their abstract interpretive lantern dance. 

This is a really funny short, but I hope the message that people come away with isn’t, “Yeah! Fuck Internet comedy!” or “Fuck our jobs are depressing.” For me it’s reminder that what you make is completely up to you, and only means as much as you put into it. Go out there and make some cool shit. 

Tue Oct 23

Bushnell Keeler, the father of my friend Toby, always had this expression: “If you want to get one hour of good painting in, you have to have four hours of uninterrupted time.”

And that’s basically true. You don’t just start painting. You have to sit for a while and get some kind of mental idea in order to go and make the right moves. And you need a whole bunch of materials at the ready. For example, you need to build framework stretchers for the canvas. It can take a long time just to prepare something to paint on. And then you go to work. The idea just needs to be enough to get you started, because, for me, whatever follows is a process of action and reaction. It’s always a process of building and then destroying. And then, out of this destruction, discovering a thing and building on it. Nature plays a huge part in it. Putting different materials together—like baking something in sunlight, or using one material that fights another material—causes its own organic reaction. Then it’s a matter of sitting back and studying it and studying it and studying it; and suddenly, you find you’re leaping up out of your chair and going in and doing the next thing. That’s action and reaction.

But if you know that you’ve got to be somewhere in half an hour, there’s no way you can achieve that. So the art life means a freedom to have time for the good things to happen. There’s not always a lot of time for other things.

David Lynch, Catching the Big Fish


I wish I were one of those writers who could write at any time—in the 45 minutes between working and dinner, or in the hour after showering and before you have to be on campus. Sometimes, if I’ve been working on something for a while, I can make that happen because it’s already in my brain. But usually I’m more of the I-need-four-hours person, which is tough.

I think my biggest problem is that I often forget about that last thing Lynch says: that there’s not always a lot of time for other things. And I think, “Oh, I technically have time to do all of these Things” - so I go for a long run, I read that article in The Atlantic everyone’s talking about, I attempt to cook some good nourishing dinner with a lot of ingredients, I watch the presidential debates, I organize my bookshelves. And you know what? Truly? That stuff can wait.

There will always be articles to read, dinners to cook, things to watch, fitness routines to engage in. But those things should not necessarily be priorities. Not if I want to leave time for the good things to happen. 

(via ecantwell)

Word. 

Sun Oct 21
hellogiggles:

Harps Not Lyres: DAD FORTUNE COOKIES
by Hesley Harps
http://bit.ly/S9LFgT
Lately, some of my fortune cookies have been getting a little practical/preachy, which made me wonder:
What if fortune cookies were actually written by dads? If so, what would they say? Enjoy this gallery of Dad Fortune Cookies!

hellogiggles:

Harps Not Lyres: DAD FORTUNE COOKIES

by Hesley Harps

http://bit.ly/S9LFgT

Lately, some of my fortune cookies have been getting a little practical/preachy, which made me wonder:

What if fortune cookies were actually written by dads? If so, what would they say? Enjoy this gallery of Dad Fortune Cookies!

Sat Sep 22

When I don’t give the Grip & Electric departments enough time for set up…

samreich:

1stassistantdirectors:

http://i727.photobucket.com/albums/ww279/carlav83/GIFS/2lsglsojpg.gif

I’m pretty sure I’ve seen Vince, Eric, and/or Corey give me these faces before.  Also, thanks to Lacy for introducing me to the best new Tumblr of the month.

This Tumblr is hilarious.